Video: Introducing Telematics.com – a new portal to the telematics world

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Telematics.com founder, Rob Prime, introduces telematics.com, a new portal into the rapidly developing world of telematics

Rob Prime, Telematics.com founder, here explains some of the thinking behind the opening of UK based Telematics.com: He says its main job at the moment is to explain telematics to the ordinary person, particularly young people who may be looking to telematics applications to provide them with better insurance products. Insurance, he believes is at the moment the main driver in the development of telematics.

However, the site will be looking at three main aspects of telematics:

  • The promotion of higher driving and road safety standards through the insurance products
  • Fleet tracking – making fleet operation more economic for the operator
  • Infotainment – the exploitation of interactive technology to improve on-board communication.

All these developments require issues of personal privacy are adequately addressed, he says.

The site will be dedicated to monitoring the unfolding of telematics which at the moment is in its infancy – this is the absolute start of a new concept, which he says will over the next few years become commonplace – he can envisage a time when every vehicle will be fitted with some kind of telematics device, either because that is what the consumer wants, or because the general benefits the technology brings will encourage governments to act to promote telematic devices.

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Jonathan Coe, Editor

Journalist and comms specialist for over 40 years – trained in print, broadcasting, and industrial intranet. Written about comms policy (eg. as radio editor at Time Out); held senior comms roles in public bodies (National Health Service, local government) and privatised undertakings (London Electricity – now Electricité de France). Since, has developed interests in the ordinary citizen's use of judicial review to challenge irrational decisions of government and the use of rights (like the Freedom of Information Act) to explore irrational decisions (like the BBC's original decision to close the BBC digital radio service BBC 6 Music).